Don’t Look Down! Final Chapter

By my second foray into the jungle to meet Pygmy tribes, I had learned a few things.  First, you will notice I’m NOT carrying my purse!
Zaire032I am also wearing a longer skirt. Despite the varying states of undress of the natives, a white woman’s knees would have been considered “enticing” to the tribe we were about to meet.  This route also went deep into the jungle and at one point, we had to cross a river using the fern covered log that served as a bridge.

Zaire033The water below was not the least bit appealing and I did my best to not look down as I crossed.  Once safely on the other side, my pilot/guide said “Sure good thing no one fell in, there are piranhas in that river.”  NOW you tell me!

Zaire034Once again we came to a clearing and found what were now familiar huts.  There was one under construction so I got a chance to see the simple, yet effective design.  Long, thin, flexible branches are collected and all the leaves removed.   One end is sunk deep into the earth then an arch is formed and the other end is also anchored into the ground.  The series of arches create the frame which is then covered with large leaves.

Zaire022Again, the band was very welcoming even though we had to rely on pantomimes and smiles rather than words.  It was apparent that despite how harsh the conditions were for ALL the residents of Zaire, now the Congo, it was especially so for the Pygmy tribes.

Zaire035

In addition to the natural challenges of living deep in an inhospitable jungle, the Congo war was heating up when I was there.  Within days of my visit to this band of Pygmies, the rebels overran the nearest village and during the course of the next few years, over 70,000 Pygmies fell victim to the violence that still plagues this region.

My pilot/guide/host was monitoring rebel movement via short wave radio and a couple of days after my Pygmy visit he announced, “I think it’s time we leave.”  We packed up, loaded the plane and headed back into Kenya.  There, on my hotel television, I received the news that the country which was Zaire when I arrived a couple of weeks ago had been taken over and was now to be known as the Congo.  The hospital, schools and most of the buildings of the mission station were destroyed.  A doctor and his family walked through the jungle to Uganda to escape.

One of my husband’s nieces has been on the Mercy Ship for the past 2 years and is getting off when it docks on the west coast of the Congo in a few weeks.  My deepest admiration goes to all those who volunteer in this harsh place to try and bring some peace and comfort to the native people so long ravished by disease, poverty and tribal war.

Zaire036

As I close my eyes to sleep in my comfortable bed, I think back to the time I slept under a mosquito net and the glimpse into a world few ever get to see that I was fortunate enough to have.

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